Future of Dolby Laboratories | Quantumrun

Future of Dolby Laboratories

Dolby Laboratories, Inc. specializes in audio noise reduction and audio encoding/compression. It was founded in 1965 in London, England before moving its headquarters to San Francisco, Calif. Dolby licenses its technologies to consumer electronics makers. Its technologies have been used in several film and TV shows, with the first film with Dolby sound being A Clockwork Orange (1971). The company also developed digital surround sounds compression scheme for movies, which is now called Dolby Digital. Dolby Digital is currently found in the HDTV (ATSC) standard of the U.S., DVD players and several satellite-TV and cable-TV receivers.

Home Country: 
United States
Industry: 
Audio encoding/ Compression audio noise reduction
Industry vulnerability to disruption: 

<p>Belonging to the media sector means this company will be affected directly and indirectly by a number of disruptive opportunities and challenges over the coming decades. While described in detail within Quantumrun’s special reports, these disruptive trends can be summarized along the following broad points:</p>

<p>*First off, the cultural shift among Millennials and Gen Zs toward experiences over material goods will make travel, food, leisure, live events and especially media consumption increasingly desirable activities.<br />
*By the late 2020s, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) will reach a level of market penetration significant enough for media companies to start shifting sizeable resources into content production for these platforms.<br />
*By the late 2030s, the widespread popularity of VR and AR will shift the public’s media consumption tastes away from voyeuristic storytelling (traditional movies and television shows) to participatory forms of storytelling that immerses the content consumer by allowing them to influence the content they experience—kind of like being an actor in the movie you’re watching.<br />
*The shrinking cost and versatility of artificial intelligence systems, combined with the increasing computational capacity of future quantum computing systems, will drive down the cost of producing higher budget looking content, especially for future VR and AR platforms.<br />
*All media will eventually be delivered primarily through subscription based platforms. Everyone will pay for the content they want to consume.</p>

Total patents held: 
891
Number of patents field last year: 
73
Ranking List: 
554
Ranking List: 
2017 Quantumrun Global 1000
367
Ranking List: 
2017 Quantumrun US 500
62
Ranking List: 
2017 Quantumrun Silicon Valley 100
Market Revenue Country: 
Market country 
United States
Revenue from country 
0.18
Market country 
Other
Revenue from country 
0.82
Prod/Serv name revenue: 
Prod/Serv name: 
Licensing
Prod/Serv revenue: 
917032000
Prod/Serv name: 
Products
Prod/Serv revenue: 
90543000
Prod/Serv name: 
Services
Prod/Serv revenue: 
18163000
Founded: 
1965
Company Name: 
Dolby Laboratories
Sector: 
Revenue: 
1025738000
3y average revenue: 
985517333
Operating expenses: 
684961000
3y average expenses: 
654612333
Company profile data note: 
All company data collected from its 2016 annual report and other public sources. The accuracy of this data and the conclusions derived from them depend on this publicly accessible data. If a data point listed above is discovered to be inaccurate, Quantumrun will make the necessary corrections to this live page.
Global employee count: 
2030
Domestic employee count: 
1237
Number of domestic locations: 
8
Funds in reserve: 
516112000
Investment into R&D: 
219607000
create term: 
#554 | 2017 Quantumrun Global 1000
#367 | 2017 Quantumrun US 500
#62 | 2017 Quantumrun Silicon Valley 100

Dolby Laboratories, Inc. specializes in audio noise reduction and audio encoding/compression. It was founded in 1965 in London, England before moving its headquarters to San Francisco, Calif. Dolby licenses its technologies to consumer electronics makers. Its technologies have been used in several film and TV shows, with the first film with Dolby sound being A Clockwork Orange (1971). The company also developed digital surround sounds compression scheme for movies, which is now called Dolby Digital. Dolby Digital is currently found in the HDTV (ATSC) standard of the U.S., DVD players and several satellite-TV and cable-TV receivers.

Home country:
United States
Sector:
Media
Industry:
Audio encoding/ Compression audio noise reduction
Founded:
1965
Global employee count:
2,030
Domestic employee count:
1,237

Financial Health

Revenue
$1,025,738,000 USD
3y average revenue
$985,517,333 USD
Operating expenses
$684,961,000 USD
3y average expenses
$654,612,333 USD
Funds in reserve
$516,112,000 USD
#1 Market country
United States
% of revenue from country #1
0.18%
#2 Market country
Other
% of revenue from country #2
0.82%

Asset Performance

#1 Product/Service/Dept. name
Licensing
#1 Product/Service revenue
$917,032,000 USD
#2 Product/Service/Dept. name
Products
#2 Product/Service revenue
$90,543,000 USD
#3 Product/Service/Dept. name
Services
#3 Product/Service revenue
$18,163,000 USD

Innovation assets and Pipeline

Investment into R&D
$219,607,000 USD
Total patents held
891
Number of patents field last year
73
All company data collected from its 2016 annual report and other public sources. The accuracy of this data and the conclusions derived from them depend on this publicly accessible data. If a data point listed above is discovered to be inaccurate, Quantumrun will make the necessary corrections to this live page.

Disruption Vulnerability

Belonging to the media sector means this company will be affected directly and indirectly by a number of disruptive opportunities and challenges over the coming decades. While described in detail within Quantumrun’s special reports, these disruptive trends can be summarized along the following broad points:

*First off, the cultural shift among Millennials and Gen Zs toward experiences over material goods will make travel, food, leisure, live events and especially media consumption increasingly desirable activities.

*By the late 2020s, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) will reach a level of market penetration significant enough for media companies to start shifting sizeable resources into content production for these platforms.

*By the late 2030s, the widespread popularity of VR and AR will shift the public’s media consumption tastes away from voyeuristic storytelling (traditional movies and television shows) to participatory forms of storytelling that immerses the content consumer by allowing them to influence the content they experience—kind of like being an actor in the movie you’re watching.

*The shrinking cost and versatility of artificial intelligence systems, combined with the increasing computational capacity of future quantum computing systems, will drive down the cost of producing higher budget looking content, especially for future VR and AR platforms.

*All media will eventually be delivered primarily through subscription based platforms. Everyone will pay for the content they want to consume.